Brook Perdigon

Introducing Brook Perdigon, the newest collection to join our Studio Four family. We are captivated by her hand painted motifs and calming colors. Brook is naturally drawn to organic geometrics which make her fabrics and wallpapers perfect for all design styles.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO TAKE THE LEAP INTO ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND DESIGNING YOUR NAMESAKE COLLECTION?

 For many years, I worked with interior designers to create custom textiles. I also worked as a senior designer for Tai Ping carpets. I understood that designers are always searching for something bespoke, something that can transform their vision into reality, and I knew I could provide that.  

Throughout my career, I developed an amazing network of designers and makers. Working with manufacturers in the US, China and Switzerland gave me a global perspective, and it fueled my desire to see my own vision come to life. 

As a designer, so much of your time is spent sitting at a desk and drawing. By launching my own business, I gave myself the opportunity to get out from behind the desk, to communicate directly with clients and manufacturers. I get to take everything I’ve learned in my career and apply it to my own collection. I also get to keep learning—it’s always exciting.

HOW DO YOU APPROACH DESIGNING NEW PATTERNS

 I look backwards to go forwards. I love historic textiles, and I’m interested in the handiwork that went into making them. I’ll often paint studies of antique textiles as a way of understanding the craft behind them.

Because I’m trained as a painter and printmaker, art is an important part of my process. I do most of my thinking through painting. The artist’s hand is key to my work—for me, it’s what transforms a pattern into a living thing.
 
When you look at my textiles, the final product is very far removed from the original inspiration. I discover the pattern through drawing, painting, and playing with shapes. I don’t set out to make geometric patterns, but that’s often where the process leads me. It’s a bit of a mystery, which I love.

YOU MANUFACTURE YOUR COLLECTION IN LOS ANGELES, WHY IS WORKING WITH LOCAL ARTISANS IMPORTANT TO YOU?

Los Angeles is the number one manufacturing city in the US, so there’s a lot of energy focused on making things. It inspires me. Supporting the local community comes naturally. There are incredible hand-printers working near me. I’m able to go in, talk through ideas, and check on my products. I love seeing the color mixing process, and following my prints through all the stages of washing. It feels like a family business. We’re all involved in making something together, and we all care that it’s a great product—the collaboration makes the end result so much better.

AS A TEXTILE DESIGNER, HOW DO YOU INCORPORATE PRINTS INTO YOUR OWN HOME?

For me, pattern begins with art. My husband and I are building a small art collection together, and we use that as a north star when we’re choosing what to bring into our home. I’m not an overly patterned person, but my husband and I have collected many antiques, textiles, and artifacts on our travels to India, France, China and Israel. In my 10 years as a rug designer, I acquired some gorgeous antique rugs. Of course, I also live with my collections. My prints feel at home among our art and objects, and they add texture to the mix. I like simplicity, complemented by a sense of individuality, and my prints bring that balance.

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY COLLECTING ON YOUR MOOD BOARD?

I don’t have a mood board, but I do have an empty wall in my living room where I hang samples and drape fabric to test what’s working. I go to museums. I go to galleries. I have an extensive library of books. I travel. My experiences are my mood board.

DESCRIBE A MOMENT IN THE EVOLUTION OF YOUR COLLECTION YOU FEEL PARTICULARY PROUD OF.

I’ve always loved the World of Interiors, so it was a thrill to see three of my designs featured in their fabric issue. As a designer for other brands, I’d had my work featured in the magazine before, but never with my name attached to it. To see my name in print in publications like the World of Interiors and the New York Times has been a rush. The textile market is full of new designers, so to be singled out as a noteworthy talent feels momentous.

WHAT'S COMING NEXT?

I’m always working and developing new collections. I recently launched a line of wallpaper, and I’m continuing to add patterns. I’m also planning several upcoming collaborations, which I can’t yet announce—it’s been a joy to meet so many talented people and expand my network. Working in new ways motivates me. I’m always learning.